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Most abused and neglected children never come to the attention of government authorities. Therefore, official government statistics do not indicate actual rates of child abuse. -- Jim Hopper

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Rhode Island CPS News Archive

The Rhode Island news section is your source for the latest in family rights news items, CPS reform efforts, open court demands, abolition of confidentiality laws that judges hide behind, foster care deaths and issues, legal cases and more... Please Email Kidjacked with news and information from the state of Rhode Island and I will include it here in our coverage.

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Rhode Island News Coverage

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) -- A review by Rhode Island's child advocate has found that four children died in the past year despite warnings from family, friends, police and others.

The findings in a report released Thursday by the Child Fatality Review Panel call for an overhaul of the way the Department of Children, Youth and Families Child Protective Services assesses risk and investigates calls placed to its hotline.

hosted.ap.org

March 24, 2017

by Shaun Towne

A report released Thursday by the Office of the Child Advocate (OCA) suggests the state of Rhode Island is not doing enough to protect at-risk children.

Upon analyzing the cases of four recent child fatalities and two near fatalities, the agency highlighted the need for drastic reform at the Department of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF).

wpri.com

March 23, 2017

by Phillip Schneider

In a battle to halt government sponsored wide-scale climate modification, also known as 'solar radiation management,' two Rhode Island legislators have introduced a bill that seeks to stop geoengineering in the state.

The two representatives, Karen MacBeth (Dem), and Justin Price (Rep), have teamed up in a bi-partisan effort to pass "The Climate GeoEngineering Act of 2016", a bill that would help the state of Rhode Island monitor this largely secretive program, potentially revealing more information to the public about geoengineering projects happening around the United States.

wakingtimes.com

March 29, 2016

by Lynn Arditi

The state office created to serve as a watchdog over Rhode Island's child welfare system lacks any clear mechanism for reporting information about the deaths or near-fatal injuries of youths involved in the state child welfare system.

The need to improve such reporting by the state child advocate's office is among a half-dozen issues raised in the draft report by the Senate Health and Human Services Committee, which oversees the state Department of Children, Youth and Families. Other issues include lack of funding for the nonprofits that DCYF contracts with to provide services to youths; inadequate transition services for youths ages 18 to 21 who are aging out of care; and lack of accountability and transparency in financial decisions.

providencejournal.com

September 30, 2013

ATLANTA - Over the last decade, the federal government has withheld money from four states and Washington for the poor performance of their child protection systems.

The effectiveness of those federal reviews and the wisdom of penalizing cash-strapped child welfare agencies has been a matter of debate among experts in the field. That issue remerged in September when two child protection workers were arrested and accused of manipulating data so it would appear they were meeting internal guidelines related to the federal review process.

washingtonpost.com

November 4, 2012

by Associated Press

A Massachusetts judge on Friday awarded a total of $3 million to two child sex abuse victims of a former Franciscan priest who served prison time for child molestation in a separate case.

Superior Court Judge Janet Sanders entered the judgment against John Dority, awarding one victim $2 million and the other $1 million. Both were abused in Boston between 1965 and 1971, starting when they were ages 10 and 13. Dority, 70, was convicted of child molestation in Rhode Island in 2005 and released from prison in 2007.

news.bostonherald.com

October 21, 2011

by David Klepper

A new federal law co-sponsored by a Rhode Island congressman includes a requirement that states run credit checks on older foster children to protect them from identity theft, something child welfare advocates say is a troubling trend.

CNS News

October 9, 2011

NEWPORT, R.I. - A Rhode Island children's advocacy group says that Newport has the highest rate of child abuse and neglect in the state.

The Newport Daily News reports that the rate of child abuse and neglect in the city was 28.3 victims per 1,000 children in 2010. That's a sharp increase from the rate of 17.3 per 1,000 in 2009 and 17.5 in 2008.

boston.com

October 6, 2011

Rhode Island spends millions of dollars each year to send dozens of foster children to out-of-state placement homes.

According to records obtained by The Associated Press, Rhode Island spent $130 million on out-of-state programs between 2002 and 2010. In some cases, children went to facilities with troubling records of abuse and child death.

wpri.com

August 15, 2011

by Lynn Arditi

PROVIDENCE - Hundreds of children living in foster care bounce from one school district to another, increasing the disruption in their lives and raising the risk that they'll fall behind or drop out.

Improving the educational stability and achievement of these children will be the topic of a forum Thursday at the Rhode Island College School of Social Work. The federal Foster Connections Act of 2008 requires child-welfare agencies to work to keep foster children in their so-called school of origin, Heimpel said. But unlike a federal law that requires school districts to pay for transporting homeless students, there is no such mandate to fund transportation for students in foster care.

projo.com

May 26, 2011

by Katie Mulvaney

A federal appeals court panel appeared perplexed Tuesday by the dismissal of a lawsuit that accuses the Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families of widespread abuse and neglect of children in state foster care.

Alston and Children's Rights filed the suit in 2007 on behalf of the 3,000 children in state custody following the death of T.J. Wright, a Woonsocket toddler beaten to death by his aunt and her boyfriend while in DCYF care. The suit initially named 10 children as plaintiffs and sought class-action status, saying their civil rights were being violated.

The Providence Journal

January 6, 2010

PROVIDENCE -- Rhode Island's child advocate is urging a federal appeals court to reinstate a lawsuit that seeks an overaul of the state's foster care system.

The class action lawsuit alleged that foster children in Rhode Island have been abused, neglected and shuffled from home to home. Alston and Children's Rights, a national advocacy organization, appealed Lagueux's decision on Monday to the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston.

Turn to 10 News

August 10, 2009

by Julia Steiny

If America's juvenile justice system were a school district, it would be deemed "in need of improvement," the federal euphemism for "failing."

According to the National Youth Justice Alliance, a juvenile offender has almost a 75-percent chance of going back into the justice system sooner or later. With results like these, "Corrections" is a bald-faced lie.

The Providence Journal

January 27, 2008

by Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families

The Department of Children, Youth and Families will initiate a Child Protective Services (CPS) investigation when a report that meets one of the five Investigation Criteria outlined below is made to the Department's CPS Hotline.

A report made to the CPS Hotline that contains a concern about the well-being of a child, but does not meet the criteria for an investigation, may be classified as an information-Referral (I/R) Report. If the report is classified as an I/R Report and the family is open to the Department, all staff involved with the case are notified and are required to review the report and respond in accordance with DCYF Policy 500.0040.

dcyf.ri.gov

December 12, 2006

Early Intervention Referral Process for Victims under Three Years Old in Indicated Child Abuse/Neglect Cases

The Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF) refers all children under the age of three (3) who are victims in an indicated case of child abuse or neglect and have a single established condition for a disability to Early Intervention (EI) services.

dcyf.ri.gov

December 12, 2006

A child advocacy group is asserting that a decision by Rhode Island officials to release an 18-year-old from state care was linked to the teen's involvement in a lawsuit against the state.

The Providence Journal reports the group Children's Rights suggests in court papers that the child, referred to as "Terrence T," was released from foster care to "moot his claims" in the 2007 lawsuit, which seeks an overhaul of the state's foster care system.

therepublic.com

Alert Kidjacked to Rhode Island CPS news!

by Annette Hall

Most states have safe haven laws on the books, permitting a new parent to drop off an infant at a local fire department or hospital without repercussions. This is a laudable service that I am certain has had a positive impact on more than one infants life over the years.

Kidjacked

May 15, 2010

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